Local elections…Paul McCartney, minorities and MPs.

Well, 48 hours after some local councils and seats were up for grabs, there seems to be a surprising status quo, with very little change and all parties crowing about their successes and, in the case of Labour, a much repeated and well briefed “solid performance “. It is quite remarkable that Labour have not done much better given the status of the government and the criticisms of their performance generally and more specifically on Brexit. Usually at this stage of a government, you would expect a massive ‘swing’ away from them, but not so in this case.

Various people are suggesting that Jeremy Corbyn and his type of politics may have reached its ‘sell by date’ or that his ‘bubble’ has burst. I wonder if it is more that the younger voters, who supported Labour at the General Election and who may not have properties or recognise (local) services, did not bother to vote? In terms of Labour’s ability to bounce back when it really counts, only time will tell.

It seems amazing to me that someone who can only pluck a few strings on a guitar and churn out largely the same turgid so called music over many decades, could possibly be made a Companion of Honour. Just looking at many of the truly great and talented people who have been so awarded in the past, merely magnifies his void in talent or qualities one would expect for and from such a distinguished group. It never ceases to amaze me how the myth of the Beatles and its 4 members survived so long. They were, still are and will always be a very shallow expression of ‘music’ even in its broadest sense.

The Windrush issue continues to plague the news and, along with so many other minority issues, seems to occupy a hugely disproportionate amount of time in the media and in Parliament. Parliament, the media and society more generally, are giving far too much ‘airtime’ to these minority issues and in many cases individuals and, as a consequence, losing sight of the many issues that affect the majority of British people. Parliament ins particular should focus on government and not raising and discussing individual grievances. The job of MPs is and should be to gather these up in a coherent form and present them to Parliament as such.

Talking of MPs, it was once suggested to me that a ‘good manager’ should justify their existence away from their team, on their return, by gathering them together and explaining to them how their absence had added value to them and their output. I have often wondered why constituents don’t insist on that from their MPs, whilst they are away from their constituency?

The BBC Proms and all that…

Well, the big day for ‘music lovers’ has come…and gone. The programme for the “largest classical music festival in the world” is out today and continues the downward trend toward some form of ‘cross-over’ music prostituting itself under the guise of ‘classical music’. There are some truly ‘classical music’ concerts, don’t get me wrong, but there is no way that the entire programme is ‘classical’ or even in some cases “music” and then there is the usual liberal dose of BBC ‘virtue signalling’…which some may call propaganda or even brainwashing. It is so sad and the abuse of Sir Henry Wood’s concept for the Proms has been hijacked and polluted by the BBC long ago. He must be turning in his grave.

I switched on BBC Radio 4 as usual this morning to listen to the over-dramatised regurgitation of the same issues as yesterday and the day before…pretending to be NEWs. Suddenly and to my amazement, I heard the dulcet tones of Billy Bragg (who I can’t abide even for a few minutes) spouting his marxist theories for the salvation of mankind. Nothing new there I thought, but as always I wondered what he was ‘selling’…a lot of the BBC output these days are in fact trailers or adverts for their forthcoming programmes. So, I was firstly dumbfounded and then horrified to hear that this was indeed a trailer, but not for a BBC programme. It was in fact for a “speech” he was giving on (marxist) economics…AT THE BANK OF ENGLAND this afternoon, in London. I almost fell off my chair…as I did when I listened to his claptrap on YouTube this afternoon, which I did in order to reassure myself of my personal assessment of this dangerous man and his ideals. I can only assume he wrote the speech…because he read it…in his opulent study in his (by most people’s measure) ‘small Marxist palace’ or, perhaps, Dacha would be a better word.

Incidentally, Billy Bragg calls himself a “musician”, so it got me thinking as to whether he would ever appear at the BBC Proms, given the direction I mentioned earlier. Given the BBC and it’s ‘leftie’ views, I guess that is highly likely.

The myths about ‘popular music’ in the late 20th and early 21st centuries…

I have read a number of posts on Twitter recently that have encouraged me to write this short blog, which some are likely to feel is somewhat of a diatribe.

These Twitter posts are not infrequent and reflect views clearly and widely held, that so-called ‘popular music’ is…and should be seen as… ‘on a par’ with music that is commonly described as ‘classical music’. Such a myth has been developed and encouraged by the ‘music industry’ (and in the case of the Beatles, by the city of ‘Liverpool’) over the last few decades and has meant an almost universal brainwashing of global citizens that this is indeed the case and that it is all accepted as ‘music’.

In the strict sense of a definition, of course, much of it is ‘music’, but the key issue for me is whether ‘art’ and especially ‘great art’ (of any type) is determined by the level of great (public and massed) adulation OR by its great content and quality. For me it is and should always be the latter.

It just cannot be, that even the ‘great’ Beatles, who managed to strum a few naive, repetitive and bland chords on a guitar to accompany some arguably catchy lyrics, could possibly be compared with even the weaker output of, say, JS Bach, Mozart, Tchaikovsky, Stravinsky or such composers. This is, frankly, an insult to anyone with reasonable senses or sensibilities.

So how have we arrived and this ludicrous point in civilisation given that, up to now and especially following the ‘age of enlightenment’, things have generally move forward and improved. I don’t have the answer for this ‘u-turn’ in our development as human beings, but it is clearly accelerating downwards based even on a cursory analysis of, say, Spotify. There we see a lot that makes even the Beatles look vaguely acceptable.