Social engineering – “Rage, rage against the dying of the light”

In recent weeks I have come to the conclusion that we in the UK are being actively socially engineered. I don’t believe that this is a recent phenomenon and do believe that this brainwashing began to accelerate, probably in the late 60s, when we began to be brainwashed right across the spectrum. Whether culturally, in accepting, for example, that the vast majority of so-called pop music had any artistic merit – which by any musical analysis is doesn’t – or in terms of more profound issues that have changed more quickly than at any time in history driven by (our) ‘wants’…and not (our) needs. This list might also include contraception, our acquisitive tendencies, abortion, divorce, the law, education, (demise of) religion and other traditions that have upheld us for many centuries.

Worse still and whilst we are so self-absorbed and ‘navel-gazing’ on the issue of Brexit, if you take a step back, it is obvious that the media – and especially the BBC – have stepped into this void and, with their left-leaning stance on many traditional issues and more importably values carefully curated over centuries, have contributed to even more acceleration, largely through the ‘back door’ and often fairly subliminally. Add this to the initiatives from Jeremy Corbyn and his Marxist followers and you have all the ingredients for a massive cultural and social shift that will change things for the worse and for ever – or until there is a sizeable cataclysm of some order or other.

Despite some thought, I cannot see that this is being driven by one person or organisation and therefore conclude that it is one of those unfortunate coincidences that occur throughout history and with the added catalyst of, for example, social media, we now have a pace and scale not seen before. If one looks across various platforms and at the views of ‘normal’ and ‘sensible’ liberal people from both the ‘left’ and ‘right’ it seems clear that there is a void emerging that would, in one form or other, recognise (that) this (is) social engineering. Much like Brexit, it is understood but there is no clarity and possibly fear of the issues or the consequences and so, what I believe to be a ‘majority’, are ‘frozen in the headlights’. With no traditional ‘safety-nets’ such as religion or trust in the law and Parliament to fall back on, we are indeed ‘frozen’.

To extract from words of Dylan Thomas:

Do not go gentle into that good night…Rage, rage against the dying of the light…

Good Friday

I am what many people would, quite accurately, describe as a non-practising Christian. However I was brought up in a society that reflected mainly/many Christian values and broadly respected the ’10 commandments’ for example. I would assume that many people would align themselves with this ‘philosophy’, even though they don’t ‘go to church regularly’, as they use (or possibly abuse) the ‘church’ for baptisms, marriages and when it comes to dying and, I feel sure, would resort to ‘talking’ to a ‘higher authority’ when faced with trauma or something/events beyond their normal day-to-day lives.

One of the problems with the demise of the ‘established church’ in the U.K., is that politicians (supported by those that voted for them) have also eroded many other parts of our established systems (and even the so-called and much maligned establishment) and ‘infrastructure’ and, as a consequence, left us with very little to ‘lean on’ when we need it most. This also means, of course, that other ‘things’ have stepped into the ‘void’ including shallow alternatives (largely generated by the media) and other established but mis-aligned (with our culture and values as a nation) religions that have not evolved in parallel with the (our) so-called ‘enlightenment’ that we in the U.K. ‘discovered’ in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Some of these religions, of course, still exhibit and ‘push’ the very values that we moved on from (and began to leave behind with massive consequences and quite literally pain for virtually everyone) in the 16th century. In turn these religions more than amply provide the fertile ground for ‘recruits’ and internal national and international conflict, that we are increasingly beginning to see in the early 21st century. For many. if not most, there is increasingly little to fall back on in a world of unlimited choice.

It seems ironic that we now have more choice than at any time in the history of the human being, having destroyed so much that would have helped us to determine what was good or bad, right or wrong, affordable or not, sensible or stupid etc etc. Let’s face it, choosing and then buying a coffee in the high street is a challenge these days, so how can we now possibly cope with the more important decisions.